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Party Word Games

July 10, 2014

I belong to a book group called the Tequila Mockingbirds. As the name would suggest, our focus is about equal parts reading and drinking, and at some point discussion of the book generally degenerates into tipsy word games.

Last weekend we played a scintillating round of Dictionary. It resembles the board game Balderdash, but all you need is a dictionary (the bigger, older and more obscure the better), pens and paper. It goes like this:

1) One person chooses a word from the dictionary and reads it out, but not the definition. It must be a word that no one in the group already knows (honour system).

2) Everyone writes an invented definition on a slip of paper (the aim is to make it as plausible as possible). The person who’s ‘it’ writes down the true definition. All the pieces of paper go into a hat.

3) ‘It’ reads out all the definitions, twice. On the second read-through, everyone votes (show of hands) as to which definition they think is correct. If they guess the correct definition, they receive one point. If someone else votes for your made-up definition, you receive two points for each person fooled.

4) Each person takes a turn choosing a word from the dictionary until you’ve gone around the circle.

 

This is my favourite game in the whole world, even more so than Scrabble (which is saying something). But my friend Amanda introduced me to another game which is also great fun. I’m not sure if it has a name, but it’s a bit like ‘Exquisite Corpse’ where everyone draws part of a picture, folds it over and passes it to the next person. Only with words:

 

1) Write down ‘The’ and two adjectives, eg ‘The damp and slimy’/’The cute but menacing’.

2) Fold your paper so these words are obscured and pass it along.

3) On the next piece of paper, write down a name. It could be anyone; a famous person, someone you know … be creative.

4) Fold your paper so these words are obscured and pass it along.

5) On the next piece of paper, write ‘and’ and two more adjectives, eg ‘and the tall, bespectacled’.

6) Fold your paper so these words are obscured and pass it along.

7) On the next piece of paper, write another name (see 3).

8) Fold your paper so these words are obscured and pass it along.

9) On the next piece of paper, write an action, eg ‘laughed immoderately at the gauchely arranged hors d’oevres.’

10) Fold your paper so these words are obscured and pass it along.

11) On the last piece of paper, write a concluding consequence, eg ‘but the ostrich had the last laugh when they failed their hydrotherapy exams.’

12) Now unfold the paper.

 

Here are some examples from the weekend,some spookily accurate – remember, no one could see the previous line. WARNING: CONTAINS ADULT THEMES:

 

The obese but surprisingly agile
Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man
and the blue-eyed and virginal
Hunter S Thompson
played a folding paper-based game that didn’t have to be dirty
so they were ordered to do 186 hours of community service.

 

The dramatically coy
Clive Palmer
and the aggressive problem child
Michael Jackson
took way to much Viagra.
They felt victorious, for a time, but as it is known to do, time passed. And they grew and had to live with what they had done. In time, they cried.

 

The smiley and smelly
John Dingle
and the logical, sadomasochistic
Amanda Vanstone
discovered the glory hole
and were arrested for indecent exposure.

 

Those are just the ones fit for public consumption. If you want to read the really hilariously filthy ones, send me a private message (this blog is accessible to my existing and potential employers!)

 

 

 

 

 

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